Tangled Up In Blue

168,795 notes

reallifescomedyrelief:

viforcontrol:

beautifuloutlier:

gwydtheunusual:

too—weird-to-live:

zafojones:

Circus Tree: Six individual sycamore trees were shaped, bent, and braided to form this.

how the hell do you bend and braid a tree

Actually pretty easy. Trees don’t reject tissue from other trees in the same family. You bend the tree to another tree when it is a sapling, scrape off the bark on both trees where they touch, add some damp sphagnum moss around them to keep everything slightly moist and bind them together. Then wait a few years- The trees will have grown together. You can use a similar technique to graft a lemon branch or a lime branch or even both- onto an orange tree and have one tree that has all three fruits.Frankentrees.

As a biologist I can clearly state that plants are fucking weird and you should probably be slightly afraid of them.

On that note! At the university (UBC) located in town, the Agriculture students were told by their teacher that a tree flipped upside down would die. So they took an excavator and flipped the tree upside down. And it’s still growing. But the branches are now the roots, and the roots are now these super gnarly looking branches. Be afraid.

But Vi, how can you mention that and NOT post a picture? D:

[source]

Just a few feet away from the Dutch elm is one of its cousins — but looking at the two, you would never know they’re related. This tree is often referred to as the “upside-down tree” by students, as its branches resemble roots. The reason for the unusual shape comes from its cultivation method: rather than sprouting from a seed, this tree grows from a Camperdown elm cutting that’s grafted onto the trunk of a Wych elm.
Cute story but…

reallifescomedyrelief:

viforcontrol:

beautifuloutlier:

gwydtheunusual:

too—weird-to-live:

zafojones:

Circus Tree: Six individual sycamore trees were shaped, bent, and braided to form this.

how the hell do you bend and braid a tree

Actually pretty easy. Trees don’t reject tissue from other trees in the same family. You bend the tree to another tree when it is a sapling, scrape off the bark on both trees where they touch, add some damp sphagnum moss around them to keep everything slightly moist and bind them together. 
Then wait a few years- The trees will have grown together. 

You can use a similar technique to graft a lemon branch or a lime branch or even both- onto an orange tree and have one tree that has all three fruits.

Frankentrees.

As a biologist I can clearly state that plants are fucking weird and you should probably be slightly afraid of them.

On that note! At the university (UBC) located in town, the Agriculture students were told by their teacher that a tree flipped upside down would die. So they took an excavator and flipped the tree upside down. And it’s still growing. But the branches are now the roots, and the roots are now these super gnarly looking branches. Be afraid.

But Vi, how can you mention that and NOT post a picture? D:

image

[source]

Just a few feet away from the Dutch elm is one of its cousins — but looking at the two, you would never know they’re related. This tree is often referred to as the “upside-down tree” by students, as its branches resemble roots. The reason for the unusual shape comes from its cultivation method: rather than sprouting from a seed, this tree grows from a Camperdown elm cutting that’s grafted onto the trunk of a Wych elm.

Cute story but…

(via daggerpen)

627 notes

giancarlovolpe:

Hey everyone!

For those of you who keep asking what I’m up to at Riot Games, here’s a cool short I had a very small hand in helping get made.

Congrats to everyone on the team for finally getting this one out there! 

(via stephaniebrownisback)

229 notes

Female writer-director. I mean as a white middle-class male I sort of waltz through life blithely being the default gender and racial type in most of the situations I’m in. And so having been the producer of a film with a female director, a female writer, a film about a woman, because Louise’s character is absolutely central, and also not about an easy woman, not about someone who is just kind of happy and smiley and, “Yeah it’s all great!” It’s about a woman with an eating disorder who’s complicated, who at times is unlikable. I find myself in meetings with distribution companies where, literally, I’m sat across the table with men my own age and older as they just look at me and go, “Women don’t go to the cinema.” I go just like, “What are you talking about?!” [And they say,] “There’s no market for this because it’s got a woman in it.”
Michael Price, from mid0nz’s awesome, interesting interview with him. The whole thing is gold, but the above stuck out to me, because it makes me feel better that a white, middle-aged man gets as pissed off about this as I do. <3 (via starrla89)

(via dduane)

385 notes

Diversity Is Not Enough: Race, Power, Publishing

tubooks:

(via daggerpen)

81,367 notes

lalondes:

>teenage actress’s private nudes get leaked

>teenage actress is reviled as a slut and a whore and a bad role model

>james franco asks a seventeen-year-old girl if he can meet her in a private hotel room

>james franco gets to go on saturday night live and joke about what a silly doofus he is for soliciting sex from a girl literally half his age

(via sephet)

1,988 notes


erikkwakkel:
Sharing a binding
This is a clever book from the 18th century, printed in Oxford in 1756. It presents both the Old and New Testament, although the books are not bound together the regular way, behind one another. Instead, the binder opted to place them next to each other. This very rare binding technique is part of a family that includes the dos-à-dos (or “back to back”) binding, which I blogged about before (here). Having the two testaments bound this way allowed the reader to consult passages from both books at the same time. Indeed, the empty pages in the front and back are filled with notes, including in Greek and Hebrew. It appears this clever binding had a reader to match.
Pic: Manchester, Chetham’s Library (source).

erikkwakkel:

Sharing a binding

This is a clever book from the 18th century, printed in Oxford in 1756. It presents both the Old and New Testament, although the books are not bound together the regular way, behind one another. Instead, the binder opted to place them next to each other. This very rare binding technique is part of a family that includes the dos-à-dos (or “back to back”) binding, which I blogged about before (here). Having the two testaments bound this way allowed the reader to consult passages from both books at the same time. Indeed, the empty pages in the front and back are filled with notes, including in Greek and Hebrew. It appears this clever binding had a reader to match.

Pic: Manchester, Chetham’s Library (source).

(via dduane)

231 notes

readerwriterdancer:

i’m telling you right now

if you are queer and not jewish, it is absolutely your responsibility to stand up when you see queer people being being antisemitic and talking about “archaic biblical laws” or whatever

if you are jewish and not queer, it is absolutely your responsibility to stand up when you see jews being homophobic and using the bible as an excuse

queer jews are already faced with homophobia and antisemitism from communities that are not ours, we shouldn’t have to be defending ourselves within our own communities as well.

(via wombatking)

628 notes

bolto:

incisorteeth:

bolto:

NOPE

NNNNNNNOPE

okay but let me tell you that we bought this as a gag gift for a het friend of mine, who promptly sprinkled that shit into her mouth and gave her fiance a blowjob

it went as awful as you can imagine, it’s literally off-brand pop-rocks. both of them got yeast infections, because apparently some of it went into his urethra

do not fucking put candy on your dick, don’t put sugar in your dick, don’t stick your sugar coated dick in someone and don’t buy this for your dumb ass het friends

IM HOWLING

(via sephet)