Tangled Up In Blue

1,424 notes

fandomsandfeminism:

stardust-rain:

isanah:

also, having spoken with both parents about the shitshow that is Lucy, we are all in full agreement that Luc Besson and the writers did absolutely zero research on Taiwan and that the movie is not worth our time or money.

like dad told me: they didn’t realize that Taiwan is one of the safest places in the world, below Sweden?

and the look on mom’s face was laugh-out-loud hilarious.

I hope to hell this movie tanks in Taiwan, if not everywhere.

 (via isanah)

I’m so fucking mad about this movie.
Because when I first heard “ScarJo gets superpowers” it sounded awesome.
But then everything about it was awful and racist and fucked up.

(via angrynativefeminists)

Filed under lucy movie

351 notes

kelsium:

If you don’t understand the difference between limiting people’s water use because of a massive, long-term regional drought, and completely cutting people’s water off because you think it’s more important that they give you a hundred bucks than that they have access to water I REALLY CANNOT HELP YOU.

(via knitmeapony)

5 notes

rubyredfeathers:

This swift inspired by this tilta swift

Most of the yarn I’ve been getting these days is in this twisted hanks..which look pretty until you untwist them. Then they become this fiddly, long, loopy, waiting to tangle in everything mess waiting to happen.  Enter the yarn swift.  They handily solve this problem..but a good one is super expensive and I’m only a hobby yarn crafter .   However..with a little ingenuity and inspiration..I made my own.  That plus a $15 ball winder from amazon…and now I get cute little yarn cakes in 15 minutes. Plus they’re called yarn cakes…how awesome is that?

Clever. I have an umbrella swift I picked up at the thrift store for practically nothing, no one knew what it was I haven’t bought much yarn in hanks, but I do wind it into hanks to dye, so it’s come in handy for those. still haven’t bought a ball winder though. I really should consider it.

Filed under yarn

78,732 notes

magneito:

mY FAVORITE THING IS HEIGHT DIFFERENCE SHIPS WHERE THE SHORT ONE IS A LITTLE CONDENSED BALL OF PURE RAGE AND THE TALL ONE IS SUPER NICE AND NERVOUS AND ALWAYS HAVING TO APOLOGIZE FOR THE SHORTER ONE 

(Source: magneito, via knitmeapony)

26,930 notes

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here
I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”
Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.
The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.
Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here

I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”

Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.

The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.

Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

(via damnbigasstrees)

4,214 notes

Anonymous asked: Do you ever think you'll stop drawing fanart? No offense it just seems like the kind of thing you're supposed to grow out of. I'm just curious what your plans/goals are since it isn't exactly an art form that people take seriously.

euclase:

Ah, fanart. Also known as the art that girls make.

Sad, immature girls no one takes seriously. Girls who are taught that it’s shameful to be excited or passionate about anything, that it’s pathetic to gush about what attracts them, that it’s wrong to be a geek, that they should feel embarrassed about having a crush, that they’re not allowed to gaze or stare or wish or desire. Girls who need to grow out of it.

That’s the art you mean, right?

Because in my experience, when grown men make it, nobody calls it fanart. They just call it art. And everyone takes it very seriously.

1,060 notes

withquestionablewit:

words like “shit” and “fuck” and “hell” and “damn” are like kitchen knives. most of the time you’re going to be using them for some practical purpose. you stubbed your toe or got a flat tire or are shocked by something. all very practical, typical things that happen. you’re basically using the words to slice bread at this point. but sometimes you’re going to use them to try to hurt someone. phrases like “fuck you” or “go to hell” are times these words are used to be hurtful. they’re not the words’ sole purpose, but they can be used that way. to continue the metaphor, they’re like verbally stabbing someone with a kitchen knife

and then there are words like “f****t” and “ps***o.” slurs in general, really, which are the verbal equivalent of guns. they were designed specifically to hurt people. their primary reason for existing is to hurt people. using them against someone is the verbal equivalent of shooting at them, and saying them when, say, you slip on a patch of ice or get really angry is the verbal equivalent of shooting a gun straight up into the air. you have no idea who’s around you and who might be struck by that verbal bullet

and that’s the difference between swearing and slurs. swearing has a practical purpose while slurs are always dangerous

(via knitmeapony)

1,968 notes

cyprith:

koryos:

Dominance Behavior in Canids

I didn’t really even WANT to make a post about this.

The alpha-beta-omega model of wolf packs is dead in scientific literature, hammered into the ground, so to speak, and it’s been dead for over ten years. So why am I still hearing about it on TV and reading about it in articles? Why are popular dog trainers that encourage you to “be the alpha” still taken seriously?

I think the unfortunate truth is that the idea that there are strong and ferocious leaders in wolf packs and that you, too, can take on that role with your dog is just somehow appealing to people. Almost romantic, in the older sense of the word. And because of this, it makes money. It sells werewolf media. It sells dog training classes. Educational science channels that have no business promoting this false ideology keep it on board because it gets people watching.

If you couldn’t tell, I’m pretty fed up with the whole thing.

Okay, let’s talk about dominance, particularly what the word even means, because popular media does a terrible job of explaining it.

Read more…

This is fantastic. I roll my eyes so hard every time I see yet another writer trotting out the alpha/beta shit for their werewolf packs.

If you want to write about a group of werewolves that are emotionally and physically assaulted by the individual they elected to lead them on a regular basis, fine. But don’t pretend that’s really how wolf packs work.

(Although, that would be pretty interesting, actually. If the author recognized that she was writing an unhealthy and abusive dynamic and actually portrayed it as such? Pack alpha character actually a violent, terrorist cult leader? Pretty neat. I’d read it.)

(via knitmeapony)